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Ramen with Korean Belly Pork

Remember how in my recipe for Korean Belly Pork I suggested making enough of the Pork so that there were leftovers? Well this is what I did with mine – fancy noodle soup.

I’ve done some research and in Japan, the word ‘Ramen’ refers to noodles that are both fresh and instant (what we’d think of as Supernoodles). My favourite dish at Wagamama‘s is Shirodashi Ramen and I sometimes try to make a version at home although I’ve never quite got it right. Ramen really took off in London a couple of years ago and outlets like Bone Daddies and Tonkotsu have been super successful. The Japanese take their ramen, like all of their food, very seriously – the film Ramen Girl is worth a watch for a Hollywood comedy take on the subject. What I have since learnt is that in Korea, their version of Ramen – ‘Ramyeon’ only ever refers to the instant variety. This version I have created is therefore neither ‘Ramen’ or ‘Ramyeon’ but who cares because it turned out damn tasty and even got a 10/10 rating from my father which is no easy feat.

If you don’t have any leftover Korean Belly Pork, you could use almost any roast or grilled meat or fish as a substitute or even some marinated tofu. You could also use your preferred noodles, just cook them per the packet instructions before putting into the serving dish.

Serves 2

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Ingredients:

2 tbsp Doengjang Paste
1 tbsp Gochujang Paste
1 tbsp Nam Pla (Fish Sauce)
1 tbsp Chicken Stock Concentrate
2 Eggs
100g Kale
200g Medium Straight to Wok Noodles
Leftover Korean Belly Pork
2 Spring Onions
80g Fresh Beansprouts


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Start by making the broth. Boil a kettle of water. Meanwhile, measure 2 tbsp Doengjang Paste, 1 tbsp Gochujang Paste, 1 tbsp Nam Pla (Fish Sauce) and 1 tbsp Chicken Stock Concentrate into the bottom of a medium saucepan. Add a little of the boiled water to the pan and dissolve the pastes.  Add a further 1 litre of the boiled water and bring to the boil.

Tip – The stock didn’t taste that spicy to me at this point but after it had boiled and sat for a while, the spice really developed so if you prefer a spicier broth, I’d recommend waiting until nearer serving before adding any more chili paste. 

Once boiling, add 2 Eggs to the stock and set a 6 minute timer. After 6 minutes, remove the eggs with a slotted spoon and run under cold water then set aside to cool a little. Turn the stock down to a gentle simmer.

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Prepare the rest of the ingredients by discarding any stalks from 100g Kale and place in a bowl. Cover with boiling water and leave for 2 minutes or so before draining.

Thinly slice Leftover Korean Belly Pork and lay out in one layer over a plate ready for reheating in the microwave for 1-2 minutes.

Tip – I’ve not specified a quantity of leftover pork as this will depend on what you have and how much of a carnivore you are. Clearly I had a truckload and added it all but I appreciate not everyone is quite this greedy.

Peel the boiled eggs and cut in half lengthways.

Peel off the outer layer and cut 2 Spring Onions into rounds, discarding the darker green parts.

Heat 200g Medium Straight to Wok Noodles. I pulled the noodles apart with my fingers and placed them into a frying pan on a medium heat with a little water for 4-5 minutes. I could have microwaved them.

Each dish can now be put together.

– Put the belly pork into the microwave to warm for 1-2 minutes.

– Meanwhile, put half of the warmed noodles into the bottom of each bowl.

– Cover half of the noodles with half of the kale and the other with half of 80g Fresh Beansprouts.

– Take the belly pork out of the microwave and place half in each bowl.

– Pour half of the stock into each bowl gently.

– Top each bowl with 2 egg halfs and half of the spring onions.

Tip – A spring of sesame seeds would also be a nice addition but I didn’t have any!

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Serve. Use chopsticks and a large spoon to eat.

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