Cedges Eats

Salted Peanut Brittle

Peanut Brittle is such an easy candy make (even without a thermometer) and a great versatile treat that I don’t know why we don’t make it more often. Just don’t tell your dentist!

Peanut Brittle is such an easy candy make (even without a thermometer) and a great versatile treat that I don't know why we don't make it more often. Just don't tell your dentist!

I make this brittle to whizz up and sprinkle on the top of my Brownie Bottomed Chocolate Peanut Cheesecake but only a small portion of it is needed for that and actually the remainder does not go to waste! I think its a cracking little treat in its own right.

Peanut Brittle was the kind of thing that I grew up hearing about but never really had. It was a treat from the television like ‘jerky’ and ‘bologna’. Over the years and my travels around the US, I’ve since tried all three and peanut brittle is the only one I’m likely to ever have again! So what is brittle? According to Wikipedia its…

Brittle is a type of confection consisting of flat broken pieces of hard sugar candy embedded with nuts such as pecans, almonds, or peanuts. It has many variations around the world, such as pasteli in Greece, croquant in France, gozinaki in Georgia, gachak in Indian Punjab, chikki in other parts of India and kotkoti in Bangladesh. In parts of the Middle East, brittle is made with pistachios, while many Asian countries use sesame seeds and peanuts. Peanut brittle is the most popular brittle recipe in the US.

I’d certainly love to give this a go with pistachios if I ever win the lottery!

Peanut Brittle is such an easy candy make (even without a thermometer) and a great versatile treat that I don't know why we don't make it more often. Just don't tell your dentist!

This recipe is taken from the Lyle’s Golden Syrup site although I have used unsalted peanuts but instead salted the caramel itself for a less overt saltiness  I felt that the golden syrup would add a little stability to my poor record at making caramel. It worked – whether it was luck or science, who knows!

Since first making this recipe I have invested in a sugar thermometer*. If using one, and I now can’t believe that I didn’t invest sooner (they’re under £7), you are looking to obtain “hard crack” which is at 150c. You will then be able to avoid the constant testing of the caramel which I did!

Peanut Brittle is such an easy candy make (even without a thermometer) and a great versatile treat that I don't know why we don't make it more often. Just don't tell your dentist!


Ingredients:

60g Butter
185g Caster Sugar
1 Tbsp Water
200g Golden Syrup
200g Unsalted Peanuts
2 Tbsp Sea Salt Flakes


Put a small bowl of cold water and ice next to the hob. You will need this for testing the caramel stage later.

Line a small brownie tin with greaseproof paper. You can also use a baking tray but the brittle will spread further.

Melt 60g Butter, 185g Caster Sugar and 1 Tbsp Water in a medium saucepan over a low heat until melted. Keep stirring whilst melting.

Add 200g Golden Syrup and continue stirring until all combined and the mixture has started to simmer – you may need to increase the heat a little.

Continue to gently boil and stir until the caramel starts to darken a little. This took longer than I was expecting – about 10 minutes.

To test when it is ready, drop a little of the caramel into your bow of ice water. When it immediately holds together and hardens it is ready. You may need to keep testing every minute or so until this happens – be patient – it will happen! You will also ‘just know’ when the texture changes. Trust your instincts.

Add 200g Unsalted Peanuts and 2 Tbsp Sea Salt Flakes whilst still on the heat and stir until totally combined.

Pour the mixture into your lined tin and leave to cool – do not be tempted to touch it for a good 10/15 minutes – molten sugar will burn

After 15 minutes you can remove from the tin (carefully) onto a cooling rack – I flipped mine over so the underside cooled more.

After another 15 minutes or whenever you want to, bash the block of brittle onto the worktop to break it up into bite size pieces. Or use a hammer – whatever floats your boat.

Let me know what your favorite american import is in the comments!


Pin Me For Later – Salted Peanut Brittle

Want to save this Slated Peanut Brittle recipe for later? Simples – pin the below image to Pinterest. Just make sure you’re signed into your Pinterest account, hover over the image then click on the red ‘Save’ icon that will appear in the top left corner.

Peanut Brittle is such an easy candy make (even without a thermometer) and a great versatile treat that I don't know why we don't make it more often. Just don't tell your dentist!


More

For more American Inspired Baking ideas, why not check out some of my other popular  stateside inspired recipes:

Baked Banana, Pecan and Maple Oatmeal
Sesame Bagels
Brownie Bottomed Chocolate Peanut Cheesecake


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5 Replies to “Salted Peanut Brittle”

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