Cedges Eats

Quick Pan Aggie (Humber Panackelty with Bacon)

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

There are not always a load of recipes I fancy trying which crop up in the BBC social history series; Back in Time… but one 1950’s recipe in 2018’s Back in Time for Tea series did.  It was a corned beef, potatoes and veg affair with a kind of beef gravy. They called it Pan Haggerty.  Now I do love a bit of corned beef but other than in a ketchup ridden sandwich or egg topped hash, I never know what to do with it. (Its also not all that cheap anymore either!) And so to Google I went but quickly became rather confused. Pan Haggerty is actually a potato and cheese dish from the North East – no meat in sight. What gives? Further investigations revealed that the Back in Time family were actually eating Panackelty – also from the North East but much more meatier and up my street. I then learned that the Humber region variation was called Pan Aggie and included bacon. Sold to the bacon fiend from the Humber.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

You may have noticed that patience isn’t my thing so instead of adding all of the ingredients raw and baking it in the oven for an age, I precook the veg elements and bacon then assemble and cook for only 20 minutes. This makes the dish a realistic weeknight feast just like my Carbonara or Haddock with Bean, Kale and Chorizo Stew.

Serves 4 (with an extra veg side)

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Ingredients:

4 Medium Potatoes (about 800g)
2 Large Carrots (about 225g)
2 Onions (about 450g)
1 Tbsp Veg Oil
225g Unsmoked Back or Streaky Rashers
1 x 340g Tin Corned Beef
4 Tbsp Cornflour
300ml Boiling Water
2 Tbsp Beef Stock Concentrate
30g Cheddar Cheese
Sea Salt Flakes


Notes:

  • I am talking about UK corned beef – the kind that comes in a tin with a little key to open it, not the US kind which is a cured brisket and not readily available in the UK.  I’m sure it would be delicious made with the US version – just different.
  • This is a composite dish – you don’t really need a recipe as such, more just general guidance. If you want to add another veg – do it (one time I middle-classed it up with some thinly sliced butternut squash).  If you want to add more/less potato or more/less meat or more/less bacon – do it. (Actually don’t add less bacon, that would be a travesty of the highest proportions).
  • This is an all in one dish to an extent but a bit of green veg on the side is quite nice – maybe a bit of buttered cabbage. And don’t forget a couple of rounds of bread and butter for a true northern tea.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.


Method:

Put the kettle on to boil and grab 2 saucepans.

Preheat the oven to 200c or equivalent.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

Peel 2 Large Carrots (about 225g) and cut into half cm slices – on a diagonal if you can to make larger slices. Add to one of the saucepans, cover with boiling water from the kettle and put on the hob at a boiling temperature.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

Repeat the process with 4 Medium Potatoes (about 800g) – peel cut into half cm slices. Add the slices the other saucepan, cover with boiling water and put on the hob at a boiling temperature.

Put the kettle back on to boil again.  Keep and eye on the potatoes and carrots as you continue. Take them off the heat, drain and put to one side as soon as they are tender.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

Meanwhile slice 2 Onions (about 450g) into half moons and start to fry on a medium heat with 1 Tbsp Veg Oil. Add a pinch of Sea Salt Flakes to the pan as you start frying.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

Open 1 340g Tin Corned Beef and slice the meat into  1/2cm slices.

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After the onions have been frying for a couple of minutes, use scissors to chop 225g Unsmoked Back or Streaky Rashers into the onion pan. I aim for 8 or so pieces from each rasher – keep them fairly chunky.

Continue to fry until the bacon with the onions on a medium/high heat until the bacon and onions are cooked through.  Remove from the heat and set aside.

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You should now find yourself with a pan of cooked bacon and onions, a pan of cooked potato, a pan of cooked carrots, sliced corned beef. Its time to assemble.

Line a baking dish with greaseproof paper.

Layer in the lined baking dish as follows:

1/3 Potatoes
1/2 Corned Beef
1/2 Carrots
1/2 Bacon and Onions
1/3 Potatoes
1/2 Corned Beef
1/2 Carrots
1/2 Bacon and Onions
1/3 Potatoes

Use a little cold water to make a slurry with 4 Tbsp Cornflour. I do this in a measuring jug. Add 300ml Boiling Water and +stir to combine with 2 Tbsp Beef Stock Concentrate.

Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.

Pour the beef stock into the dish and grate 30g Cheddar Cheese over the top.

Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes until golden and crispy on top.

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Serve hot with a side of greens – it also reheats very well in the microwave.

Let me know in the comments what you think or if you remember this dish from the ‘good old days!’


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Ever heard of Pan Aggie, Panackelty or Panaklty/Panaclty? Me neither until recently. Turns out that its a proper traditional northern English tea of corned beef, sliced potatoes, veg and a light beef stock. Pan Aggie is the regional Humber version with added bacon. Read on for my speedy version of an old frugal stalwart.


More

For more cooking and baking ideas, why not check out some of my other other traditional British recipes:

Russian Slice
White Spelt Scones for Wimbledon
Bacon and Cheese Quiche
Chicken, Gammon & Mushroom Pie

Proper Puff Sausage Rolls
Proper British Pancakes
Proper Yorkshire Puddings


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